Inkadinkado Stamping Gear Basic Techniques

April 12, 2013 — 7 Comments

So it’s been a busy first show launching the Stamping Gear System from Inkadinkadoo and we have covered a range of techniques on air. In the first show I highlighted some basic techniques for using with this system so I thought that I would create a quick post to show you them again in case you missed them.

For all these examples I used the circular cog and chose a random stamp design.

Open Basic.

The open basic is performed by stamping into each alternative space in the cog or wheel.

This is a simple repeat pattern and can be used in a variety of ways but is particularly suitable for larger stamps that would look too congested if every space was used, as in the Closed Basic.

Inkadinkado Stamping Gear Scan - Open Basic

Inkadinkado Stamping Gear Scan – Open Basic

Closed Basic.

The closed basic is a follow on to the Open Basic technique and creates a fuller pattern by stamping into every single space of the cog or wheel.

This is a great technique if you have small stamps or would like your larger stamps to overlap.

Inkadinkado Stamping Gear Scan - Closed Basic

Inkadinkado Stamping Gear Scan – Closed Basic

Shadow Stamping

This uses the Closed Basic technique but instead of inking your stamp each time you make an impression you stamp once, then again and then re-ink. This will give you a lighter version of the image on every other impression as you can see below.

Inkadinkado Stamping Gear Scan - Shadow Stamping

Inkadinkado Stamping Gear Scan – Shadow Stamping

Alternate Colours

With the previous technique you were using only one colour. With this next technique you use two alternate colours.

As you will usually only have one of a stamp, it is obviously easier to do a complete circuit of one colour using the Open Basic technique and then fill in the spaces with the second colour.

Inkadinkado Stamping Gear Scan - Alternate Colours

Inkadinkado Stamping Gear Scan – Alternate Colours

Ombre

The ombre style is a technique that uses two colours on the stamp each time you make an impression.

Depending on how and where you apply the colour to the stamp will also change the overall look of the pattern.

Tip: Always apply the lighter colour first, this avoids you’re lighter coloured inkpads becoming dis-coloured with the darker colours.

Inkadinkado Stamping Gear Scan - Ombre

Inkadinkado Stamping Gear Scan – Ombre

Offset

In all of the previous techniques we have positioned the stamp centrally on the paddle however by offsetting the stamp you can achieve a totally different look as you can see in the image below.

For this I still had the stamp centrally on the paddle but turned it 45 degrees.

Inkadinkado Stamping Gear Scan - Offset

Inkadinkado Stamping Gear Scan – Offset

Seeing Double

This technique was achieved by positioning the stamp in two different places on the paddle.

On the first circuit I positioned the stamp at the bottom of the paddle and on the second circuit I placed it at the top.

I could have completed another circuit in the middle to really build out the design.

Inkadinkado Stamping Gear Scan - Seeing Double

Inkadinkado Stamping Gear Scan – Seeing Double

Alternate Stamps

This technique is achieved by completing one circuit using the Open Basic technique with one stamp and then a second circuit filling in the spaces with an alternate stamp.

Inkadinkado Stamping Gear Scan - Two Designs

Inkadinkado Stamping Gear Scan – Two Designs

Double Stamping

With the previous technique I used one stamp at a time however if you add two or more stamps to the paddle before you begin stamping then you will again get a totally different look as you can see below.

Inkadinkado Stamping Gear Scan - Double Stamping

Inkadinkado Stamping Gear Scan – Double Stamping

Closed Basic with a Large Design

As mentioned earlier, using larger stamps with a Closed Basic technique will result in overlapping of the designs as you can see below. This can look good with many designs.

You can always combine this technique with the Alternate Colours technique or Alternate Stamps technique to create all sorts of patterns.

Inkadinkado Stamping Gear Scan - Closed Basic with Large Stamp

Inkadinkado Stamping Gear Scan – Closed Basic with Large Stamp

Closed Basic with a Large Stamp and Masking

With the previous technique the impressions overlapped each other however you can mask certain areas to prevent this happening if you wished.

To do the style seen below, complete one circuit using the Open Basic technique and then complete a second circuit but apply a mask (made from a sticky note or something similar) to the two impressions either side of the area in which you are going to stamp. You can of course mask the lot before you start if you wanted – it’s up to you.

Inkadinkado Stamping Gear Scan - Closed Basic with Large Stamp with Masking

Inkadinkado Stamping Gear Scan – Closed Basic with Large Stamp with Masking

Combining Techniques

With the knowledge that you can use any of your unmounted rubber stamps with the Inkadinkado system you can combine any of the techniques above to achieve lots of different results.

The design below was achieved by completing one circuit using a dark colour and the Open Basic technique. These impressions were then masked and an alternate colour was used to fill in the spaces and create a Closed Basic design using alternate colours. The stamp was from a set offered by Tonic Studios.

Inkadinkado Stamping Gear Scan - Closed Basic with Floral Stamp and Masking Technique

Inkadinkado Stamping Gear Scan – Closed Basic with Floral Stamp and Masking Technique

The possibilities are really endless with this system and I hope that you will give it a go; I will certainly continue making cards with this system and upload the designs for you all to see.

If in the meantime you have any more questions, please feel free to leave a message in the comments section below and I’ll be happy to respond.

Ta for now.

John :)

7 responses to Inkadinkado Stamping Gear Basic Techniques

  1. 
    Katie-Louise sweetlove August 11, 2013 at 12:27 am

    Hi John just wanted to thank you for this very informative post together with your great and easy to follow demos on c&c I have a good idea of where to start when my starter set and extras come through the post! Thank you.
    Best wishes from Katie-Louise

    Like

  2. 
    Denise Phillips April 14, 2013 at 8:08 pm

    Loved all your demos! Having had a “Hunkydory buying spree” recently, i fought the temptation to buy the starter square set and the deluxe round, until just before I left home for my night shift tonight. (I’m but a weak n feeble crafter…. who am i to resist!! lol) Looking forward to their arrival. :-) x

    Like

  3. 

    A watcher emailed the studio suggesting you use acetate instead of the slim jim. Seems like a plan to me. Bought my sets waiting for them to come.

    Like

    • 

      Both plans seem a good idea. I guess it depends if you need to work with clear stamps – in my mind theres only a couple of reasons you might want to use clear stamps with this system as the positioning is ‘built in’ – I guess it’s a personal preference and what people are used to. Either way, I hope you enjoy it :)

      Like

  4. 
    billiescraftroom April 12, 2013 at 8:41 pm

    Hi John

    Started to watch your Inkadinkado show earlier, you mentioned wanting a way to get clear stamps onto the system but that they needed the depth of the foam because of the shaping on the handle.

    Had a think and wondered if this might work?

    1. Cut a piece of EZ mount foam to just smaller than the available plate size, on the Inkadinkado handle.

    2. Attach the cling side of the EZ mount to the Inkadinkado handle.

    3. While the foam is on the Inkadinkado handle, attach the sticky side of the foam to a small slim jim or similar thin piece of acrylic. By putting the cling side on the handle first, you can line up any thin acrylic block to stay clear of any connectors.

    3. This should give the depth of the foam and as long as the slim jim is small enough, not interfere with the connecting areas of the handle system.

    The EZ mount stays attached to the slim jim, but the cling side means you can take it on and off the Inkadinkado system. The other side of the slim jim, gives you the acrylic block to attach regular clear stamps to, without having to put each stamp on to foam ;) If the slim jim is small enough hopefully it wouldn’t interfere with the connectors.

    Worth a try :) ;) Do let me know if it works :) (Hope all that made sence!)

    Best wishes

    Billie

    PS. Sorry for trying to send this as PM on Twitter DOH!!!!

    Like

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